Twila Palmer - Westford Real Estate | Westford, MA Real Estate, Chelmsford, MA Real Estate


Is now the right time to lower the asking price for your residence? If you've studied the housing market closely, set an aggressive price for your home and are still struggling to generate interest in your residence, the answer to this question may be a resounding "Yes."

Ultimately, there are many reasons why you may want to consider lowering the asking price for your house, including:

1. It has been many weeks or months since the last home showing.

Although your home listing initially may have stirred up plenty of interest, homebuyers have shied away from your residence over the past few weeks or months. Thus, there may be no time like the present to lower your house's asking price to widen your net of prospective homebuyers.

Reducing your house's asking price by even a few thousand dollars may help you generate interest in your residence. And in the days following a price drop, you may notice a significant increase in the number of requests for home showings as well.

2. Your home asking price no longer corresponds to the current real estate market's conditions.

A seller's market can quickly morph into a buyer's market. As such, you should evaluate the real estate sector regularly to ensure your home asking price corresponds to the current housing market's conditions.

Take a look at available houses that are similar to your own – you'll be happy you did. This housing market data can help you determine if your house is priced appropriately based on the competition.

Also, examine the prices of recently sold houses in your city or town. That way, you can see how long these residences were available before they sold, find out whether you're operating in a buyer's or seller's market and plan accordingly.

3. You need to sell your house as soon as possible.

If you face a time crunch to sell your home, you should establish an aggressive price for your residence from the get-go. However, if you fail to generate substantial interest in your residence, you may need to act fast to lower your home asking price to meet your deadline.

For those who want to avoid the possibility of lowering a house's asking price, it often pays to work with a real estate agent. This housing market professional can help you establish a fair, competitive price for your residence, one that should help you stir up significant interest in your home.

In addition, a real estate agent will work with you throughout the home selling process. He or she will set up home showings, host open houses and negotiate with homebuyers on your behalf. Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent is happy to respond to your home selling questions and ensure you can make informed home selling decisions.

Before you lower your home asking price, consult with a real estate agent. By doing so, you can get the expert home selling advice that you need to determine whether to wait out the current housing market or reduce the price of your residence.


When you sell your home, it may be tempting to just try and put your home on the market yourself without any assistance. By hiring a real estate agent, you’ll have a insurance policy of sorts that allows you to know that everything is taken care of throughout the process of selling. The general goal in selling a home is to sell it as fast as possible for the most amount of money that you can. A realtor should do a bit more for you than simply post the home and hope that it sells. Here’s what a great realtor who is looking to be an advocate for their sellers will do for you:


Put The Home On The Market For The Right Price


Selling a home at the right price is the single most important thing that can be done in the entire process. A good seller’s agent will pinpoint the right price for your home. If the home is priced too high, there will be no interest in the property. People will believe that the price can only come down. If the price is set too low, a bidding war can ensue, or buyers may wonder what’s wrong with the property. There’s many different formulas and methods that agents will use to price the property right. The important thing is that the agent does his research.


The Market Needs To Be Marketed


Marketing is one thing that agents should be good at. A good seller’s agent will take good photos of a property or hire a professional photographer if needed. The photos and videos that are put up online are a big part of how homes get sold. Buyers want to know the property before they even see it in person. A realtor can help make this impression visible online.


Communicate With You


An agent should keep their sellers informed about what’s going on in the sale of their home. Even if offers haven’t come in, realtors should be getting in touch with their clients regularly to update them on home showings, concerns, and open house dates. A good seller’s agent will regularly communicate with you throughout the sale of your home. At the start of the sale, you’ll know a realtor is a good fit since they’ll return your calls and e-mails promptly.


Be There For The Home Appraisal


When you’re selling your home, the appraisal can be one of the most nerve-wracking things that occurs during the entire process. Your agent should attend the appraisal to help clarify confusion and answer the appraiser’s questions. The realtor will be educated on the recent updates that have been made to the home. These are what add immense value to the home.


If you’re selling your home it can be frustrating when you aren’t receiving any offers. Perhaps you’ve heard that it’s a seller’s market and that the offers on your house would be flying in. However, it’s more complicated than that.

Whether or not your house receives offers is determined by a number of reasons--some that in your control, others that aren’t. But, that doesn’t mean you have to give up and sell your house at a low price.

In this article, we’ll discuss what to do if your house just isn’t selling. We’ll talk about some reasons why people may be hesitant to bid, to inquire about a showing, and to seal the deal and purchase your home.

Revisit the comparable properties

If your home has been on the market for a while, it’s a good idea to check out the other recent homes in your neighborhood to see how their prices compare to the listing price of your home. Since the market fluctuates, other sellers could be adjusting the cost to reflect the current rates, leaving yours higher than it should be.

When pricing your home, make sure you are comparing your house to those that have actually sold. Using houses that have been on the market for a while as a baseline might mean you’ve priced your home too high to sell just like theirs.

Also, make sure you are using houses that share many of the common features that yours does. This can include:

  • Square footage

  • The year the house was built

  • Number of bedrooms and baths

  • The lot size

  • The condition of the home

Remember, it isn’t all just about location.

Getting more leads

If people aren’t making inquiries about your home, there are a few things you should check up on. First, make sure your listings are updated and accurate. The contact info should be easy to find, and you or your real estate agent should provide multiple means of contact (email, cell phone, text, etc.).

Next, ensure that you’ve given enough details about the house. If people are searching for a specific number of rooms but your listing doesn’t mention the number of rooms you have, you might be missing out on several inquiries.

Finally, make sure your photos are high resolution and well-lit. You want to make sure visitors to your listing can get a clear idea of what your home looks like. If your photos are small, dark, blurry, or if they make the house look cramped and cluttered, you should retake your photos or consider hiring a photographer.

Getting more offers

If you’ve had plenty of inquiries and showings but you aren’t getting any offers there may be a deeper, underlying issue that needs to be addressed. Usually, this means your home needs important repairs and upgrades that buyers simply don’t want to make.

If your house is priced to be move-in ready but it’s not, you’ll have to make some upgrades or lower the price.

Not working with an agent

Sellers can also have a difficult time getting offers if they attempt to sell the home themselves without using a real estate agent. If your home is FSBO (For Sale by Owner), you’re missing out on a number of listing services and connections that an agent can provide.


Want to make your home appealing to a broad range of homebuyers? Devote the necessary time and resources to get your residence move-in ready. By doing so, you may be able to generate substantial interest in your residence and accelerate the home selling process. Getting your home move-in ready can be quick and simple – here are three tips to ensure you'll be able to prep your house accordingly: 1. Prioritize cosmetic repairs. Repair broken baseboards, leaky faucets and other minor problems that otherwise might damage your home's value. This enables you to enhance your home's appearance and ensure buyers won't have to worry about these repairs if they decide to purchase your residence. Completing cosmetic repairs might seem tough at first, but making a list and finishing it item by item can help you make the right fixes without delay. And after these repairs are performed, you'll be able to boost your home's chances of making a positive first impression on homebuyers. Remember, cosmetic repairs may appear costly and time-consuming, but they can deliver long-lasting value. Homebuyers are sure to notice even the smallest issues when they examine your residence, and home sellers who eliminate these problems altogether can speed up the home selling process. 2. Clear as much space as you can. De-cluttering is paramount for home sellers, especially if they want to get their homes move-in ready. And home sellers who strive to clear out as much clutter as possible can increase their chances of an immediate sale. Typically, homebuyers want to envision what it's like to live in a house during a home showing. Meanwhile, if you de-clutter your residence, you'll be able to make it easier for homebuyers to consider how they may transform this house into a home. When it comes to showcasing your residence, you'll want to do everything possible to create a memorable experience for homebuyers. Therefore, de-cluttering will enable you to take another step toward helping your residence make a distinct impression on homebuyers. 3. Go neutral whenever possible. Dazzling homebuyers is important, and using neutral colors throughout your home may help you impress homebuyers as soon as they enter your residence. For instance, bright yellow walls can make a bold statement but could turn off the majority of homebuyers. In this scenario, homebuyers may move on to another residence or make you a below-average offer (and wind up repainting the walls if they purchase your residence, too). On the other hand, the use of neutral colors can help you boost your home's appearance in a number of ways. These colors will complement a wide range of individual styles and tastes and feature a classic look and feel. As a result, homebuyers likely will notice a home seller's use of neutral colors for all the right reasons. And ultimately, this may accelerate the process of generating genuine interest from buyers who check out your house. Selling a residence often can be difficult for inexperienced and experienced home sellers alike. Fortunately, those who are focused on getting their houses move-in ready can improve the quality of their residences and boost their chances of a quick sale.

When you find a home that you love, you probably already have been pre-approved by a bank for a certain amount that will enable you to buy a home. Once you put in an offer on the home and it’s accepted, however, you may need to take a step back. The appraisal can help you to know what the value of the home actually is. The bank may decline your loan based on the appraisal This is one of the most important steps to obtaining the financing that you need to purchase a home. 


What Is An Appraisal? 


In a nutshell, an appraisal protects the bank from investing in a property that’s worth less than what they’re paying for it. This process also protects you as a buyer from buying a property that’s worth less than what you’re expecting it to be worth. 


Although the appraisal makes sense financially, it doesn’t mean that the process won’t be emotional for you as a buyer and for the sellers as well. The appraisal can in fact make or break the purchase of what you consider as your dream home. There’s a lot of data that’s collected for the appraisal, which can cause nerves to be shot on both sides while the value of the home is being calculated.     


What’s The Difference Between The Inspection And The Appraisal?


A home appraisal is much different than an inspection. The home inspection is important in its own right. As a buyer, you hire a home inspector to find any potential problems or hazards that could be big issues for you in the future as a homeowner. While property appraisers will make note of glaring issues, they won’t check out the nuts and bolts of the home like a home inspector will. The home inspector checks out everything from the air quality to the chimney to the toilet and sinks. There’s many things that will affect your home appraisal. In other words, if you’re a seller, you want to get major issues fixed before you put your home on the market. Home inspections will be very important for different reasons to you as a buyer since it will be valuable to you in the future. Appraisers may request an inspection if they notice something serious within the home, but they are more interested in the value of the property than the direct problems that are within the home. 


Who Will Pay For The Appraisal?


Generally, the seller will pay for the home appraisal along with the closing costs. This can be a few hundred dollars. In certain circumstances the buyer may agree to pay for the appraisal, however.   


What Goes Into Calculating The Worth Of A House?


Appraisers look at many different factors including: 

  • The square footage of the property
  • The number of bedrooms
  • How many bathrooms the home has
  • The condition of the home
  • How much have comparable properties have sold for in the area
  • Safety issues
  • Other factors pertaining to health and safety            


The appraisal process can seem complicated, but once you’re educated on the matter, you’ll be prepared when it gets to that point in the home buying process.




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