Twila Palmer - Westford Real Estate | Westford, MA Real Estate, Chelmsford, MA Real Estate


What Is The Disclosure Statement?


Disclosure statements are used in many of life’s situations. This is the place where the buyer is able to learn about the ins and outs of the property that they are about the buy. Examples of items that would be on a seller’s disclosure are:


  • Water in the basement
  • Updates made to the home
  • Known pests
  • Paranormal activity
  • Death on the property
  • Past fires
  • Nearby major construction projects
  • Title 5 sewerage issues 


Disclosures Serves As Protections


The disclosure statement serves as a protection for both the buyer and the seller. From a buyer’s perspective, through this information, they are able to understand a bit more about the property that they are potentially buying. 


On the seller’s side of things, the disclosure statement serves a s legal protection of sorts. The seller is obliged to reveal anything about the property that could potentially affect the value or affect the living conditions.


How Does The Seller Make The Disclosure


Each state and even each city within a state varies in the way a disclosure is conducted.  The statement can be composed of dozens of documents that need to be signed by the seller. Other states have disclosure document forms that consist of a series of yes or no questions about the home. Sellers may also be required o present communications between neighbors, owners, and agents. In some states, the disclosure statement is valid for up to 10 years, allowing buyers to collect damages if something wasn’t properly presented on the statement.  


How Do Sellers Know What To Disclose?


The basic rule of thumb is that if you know something about your property, you should disclose it. If you try to hide something, it could come back to meet you in the form of a lawsuit, even years later. Many states have legal requirements as to what should be revealed on these documents.  


What’s Disclosed To Buyers?


The disclosure doesn’t have to be all bad. This document is also an opportunity for sellers to present any of the improvements that they have made to the home. Make sure that you include all of the upgrades, renovations, and improvements that you have made to the home that you’re selling. This can help to impress buyers as to how well you have taken care of the property.


It’s easy as the buyer to check some of these improvements as you can find out if the work was done with or without permits by checking with the city’s zoning reports. Work that was done without a permit may have not been completed according to code. This could pose some serious health and safety risks to you and your family. 


Problems that you’ll want to disclose as a seller include pest problems, property line disputes, disturbances in the neighborhood, liens on the property, and appliance malfunctions. 


Remember that the disclosure doesn’t substitute the buyer’s right to a professional inspection of the property. It’s important for buyers to know as much about a property as they can in order to be sure they’re making a good investment.


After you accept a homebuyer's offer on your residence, he or she likely will complete a home inspection. Then, the homebuyer may choose to move forward with the home purchase, rescind or modify his or her offer or ask the home seller to complete home improvements.

Ultimately, a home seller is likely to have many questions following a home inspection, including:

1. What did the homebuyer discover during the home inspection?

As a home seller, it is important to do everything possible to enhance your residence before you add it to the real estate market. By doing so, you can boost your chances of generating substantial interest in your house. Plus, when a homebuyer performs a home inspection, he or she is unlikely to find any problems that may slow down the home selling process.

An informed home seller may conduct a home appraisal prior to listing his or her house on the real estate market. This appraisal enables a home seller to identify potential trouble areas within a residence and explore ways to address such problems.

If you failed to perform a home appraisal, there is no need to worry. For home sellers, it is important to see a home inspection as a learning opportunity. And if a homebuyer identifies problems with your residence during a home inspection, you should try to work with him or her to resolve these issues.

2. Should I stand my ground after a home inspection?

Be realistic after a home inspection, and you'll be able to make the best decision about how to proceed.

For example, a home seller who goes above and beyond the call of duty may address major home problems prior to listing his or her house on the real estate market. This home seller will dedicate the necessary time and resources to correct home problems and ensure a homebuyer is able to purchase a top-notch residence.

But what happens if a homebuyer identifies problems during a home inspection, despite the fact that a home seller already tried to correct various home issues?

A home seller should consider the homebuyer's inspection report findings closely. If minor home repairs are needed, he or she may be able to fix these problems to move forward with a home sale. Or, if a homebuyer is making exorbitant demands, a home seller may feel comfortable allowing the homebuyer to walk away from a home sale.

3. How should I proceed after a home inspection?

A home inspection can be stressful for both a home seller and a homebuyer. After the home inspection is completed, both parties will be better equipped than ever before to make informed decisions.

If a homebuyer encounters many problems with a residence, he or she will let the home seller know about these issues. Then, a home seller can complete assorted home repairs, offer a discounted price on a home or refuse to perform the requested home maintenance.

Working with a real estate agent is ideal for a home seller, particularly when it comes to home inspections. A real estate agent will negotiate with a homebuyer on your behalf and ensure you streamline the home selling process.


Selling a home requires time, dedication and patience. As such, you need to be aware of the biggest dangers associated with selling a residence before you add your home to the real estate market; otherwise, you risk wasting your valuable time and resources. One of the biggest home selling dangers often remains ignored – self-sabotage. And if you're not careful, you may sabotage your chances of selling your residence without even realizing it's happening. So what can you do to avoid the danger of self-sabotaging your home sale? Here are three tips that home sellers can use to eliminate this risk altogether: 1. Be Realistic About the Price and Value of Your Home. Employ a professional appraiser to evaluate your home before you list it on the real estate market. By doing so, you'll be able to better understand what your home is worth and price it appropriately. Also, keep in mind that what you ask for your house may not be what homebuyers offer for your residence. For instance, in a seller's market, you might actually receive multiple offers that exceed your initial asking price. Conversely, in a buyer's market, you may wind up getting numerous offers at or below your original asking price. Regardless of whether you're selling your residence in a buyer's or seller's market, however, it is important to remain flexible. Ultimately, you need to feel comfortable with the initial asking price you set your house and the offers you receive for your residence, and only then will you be able to finalize an agreement that works well for both you and a homebuyer. 2. Act Fast on Any Offers You Receive. It is paramount to prepare for offers before they arrive, as this will enable you to act quickly and efficiently. Typically, you'll only have a short amount of time to decide whether to accept a homebuyer's proposal. And if you plan for prospective offers you'll receive, you can act confidently under duress. Consider how you'll respond if you receive an offer that meets or exceeds your initial asking price, along with how you'll respond to an offer that falls below your initial expectations. Because if you plan for the best- and worst-case scenarios, you'll be better equipped to minimize the chance of sabotaging a home sale. 3. Work with an Experienced Real Estate Agent. Collaborate with an experienced real estate agent, and you'll be able to prevent the risk of self-sabotage. A real estate agent will help you determine the best price for your home and get your residence ready for a home showing. Meanwhile, this professional likely will possess years of experience and ensure you understand the ins and outs of the real estate market, allowing you to make the best decisions possible relative to your home sale. Find the right real estate agent to sell your home – you'll be thrilled you did! With an expert real estate agent at your disposal, you'll be able to improve your chances of finding many interested homebuyers and getting multiple offers for your residence. Understand the danger of self-sabotage, and you can prevent this problem from arising as you attempt to sell your house.

Nothing beats the warm, inviting feeling that you get when you enter your kitchen. However, failure to keep your kitchen clean can impact the quality of your kitchen. This ultimately can make a big difference in how homebuyers perceive your kitchen, along with whether they decide to submit an offer for your home. Fortunately, there are many simple ways to keep your kitchen looking great day after day, including: 1. Use baking soda to clean your tile floors. Your tile floors were beautiful after they were installed. But since that time, they've become dirty, grimy and tough to clean. But we have a surefire solution to help you revamp your kitchen's tile floor – baking soda and water. The combination of baking soda and water serves as a wonderful tile floor cleaner that is easy to apply with a mop. And within minutes of using it, you may notice that your kitchen's tile floor looks as good as new. 2. Eliminate wall splatters. Over the years, you've prepared a wide range of meals in your kitchen – everything from spaghetti and meatballs to sloppy joes. Unfortunately, not every dish has been an instant success. And as such, there have been many splashes of various ingredients that have landed on your kitchen's ceiling, floors and walls. Eliminating wall splatters may seem impossible at first. Luckily, there are numerous viable options to help you remove them without delay. For stains on painted walls, you may want to use a wet cloth or paper towel. The combination of a wet cloth or paper towel and tough scrubbing will allow you to eliminate stains on painted walls immediately. Comparatively, oily stains may require water and dishwashing soap. This mix is powerful and will ensure that you can remove cooking grease and other oily stains. 3. Disinfect the garbage disposal. Your kitchen's garbage disposal has served you well, but bad garbage disposal odors may persist if you're not careful. On the other hand, home sellers who focus on keeping their kitchen's garbage disposal clean can avoid such odors altogether. Looking for a great way to clean your kitchen's garbage disposal? Using a mix of vinegar, water and ice cubes can help you clean and deodorize your kitchen's garbage disposal quickly and effortlessly. Dedicate the necessary time and resources to disinfect your kitchen's garbage disposal, and you can guarantee that this disposal remains clean and performs consistently. 4. Wipe out the refrigerator. In many cases, home sellers may include a refrigerator in a home sale. As such, you'll want to keep this refrigerator looking and performing great. Wiping out your refrigerator and removing expired items regularly is essential. By doing so, you can remove the risk of bad odors from escalating in your kitchen. Of course, don't forget to keep an open box of baking soda in your refrigerator, too. This box should be changed periodically and will provide a fresh scent any time you open your refrigerator door. Keep your kitchen clean, and by doing so, you may be able to boost your chances of a quick home sale.

If you have ever sold anything, you know that the better it looks, the more likely you will be successful and get more or less what you were asking. The same goes for selling your home. Setting it up to look attractive and worthy of the asking price is known as staging, and, with a little bit of work, you can do it yourself. There are companies that will come in and do this for you, but it may be cost prohibitive and will mean that you will make less money on the overall sale. First, the inside: walk around, into each room, with a notebook in hand and jot down what you see that could be improved. Do you or your family members have a lot of clothes, papers, and the like laying around? How are the closets? Stuffed and unruly? Closets can be a nightmare to clean, and often take days, so you might want to tackle those first. Downsize as much as you can, and bring the unwanted or unneeded clothes or items to Goodwill or any donation shop. There are many boxes to drop off things, but if you are donating a lot of things, go to the shop itself and get a receipt from them for a tax deduction. Next, tackle the kitchen. Put away those small appliances that you use only occasionally, and keep the countertops uncluttered and clean. Kitchen cabinets should be washed down and any loose doors tightened and handles replaced if broken. Shine everything up: kitchen sink, windows; clean the screens, wash out the microwave, and clean the oven. Finicky potential buyers will look at everything to see how much care you take of your home. The living room should be uncluttered and dust-free. Stains on the carpet and couches must be dealt with, as this will immediately turn potential buyers off. Invest in new throw pillows and maybe a coordinating throw to add a fresh, clean look to the area. Again, make sure the windows are clean, screens vacuumed, and drapes or blinds have been dusted. The bathroom areas should be attended to, also. Clean mildew off the tiles, wash the floor, mirror, countertop and the fixtures. Shine the faucets, using a dryer sheet, for extra easy shine. Put clean towels out. Remove any dirty laundry! Replace the shower curtain and bath mats with new and colorful ones, if needed. A little bit of elbow grease will pay off, hopefully, so get started. Just think of this as “company’s coming”; you always did clean your house to make it look comfortable and enticing when expecting your in-laws, didn’t you?



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